shoomlah:

God I love dagged sleeves.  Almost as much as I love slashed ones.  I just want to dag and slash everything I can get my hands on.
I’ve wanted Maleficent to be the first villain in the series for a while now, ever since I made the mental leap between Maleficent’s horns and 15th century horned hennins.  The time period works out pretty well, actually, since I wanted her to look a little more dated than Aurora’s 1480’s getup- both houppelandes and horned hennins were all the rage during the early- to mid-1400’s, and they make for pretty good analogues to her official costuming.  Sexy stuff.
This proves more than any of the previous pieces that these are adaptations, not improvements.  I mean, look at the original Maleficent design- how does one improve on PERFECTION
-C
See the rest of the series HERERead the FAQ HEREBuy prints HERE

shoomlah:

God I love dagged sleeves.  Almost as much as I love slashed ones.  I just want to dag and slash everything I can get my hands on.

I’ve wanted Maleficent to be the first villain in the series for a while now, ever since I made the mental leap between Maleficent’s horns and 15th century horned hennins.  The time period works out pretty well, actually, since I wanted her to look a little more dated than Aurora’s 1480’s getup- both houppelandes and horned hennins were all the rage during the early- to mid-1400’s, and they make for pretty good analogues to her official costuming.  Sexy stuff.

This proves more than any of the previous pieces that these are adaptations, not improvements.  I mean, look at the original Maleficent design- how does one improve on PERFECTION

-C

See the rest of the series HERE
Read the FAQ HERE
Buy prints HERE

medievalthedas:

The tunic with Dalmatic sleeves strikes me as particularly Dragon Age-y.

(Source: mirousworlds, via mirousworlds)

medievalthedas:


Horse armour of King Henry VIII (known as the Burgundian Bard). Flemish, about 1511-15. Part of an armour presented by the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, to Henry VIII to mark his marriage to Katherine of Aragon. Made by Guille Margot and decorated by Paul van Vrelant

Royal Armoury

medievalthedas:

Horse armour of King Henry VIII (known as the Burgundian Bard). Flemish, about 1511-15. Part of an armour presented by the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, to Henry VIII to mark his marriage to Katherine of Aragon. Made by Guille Margot and decorated by Paul van Vrelant

Royal Armoury

(Source: mirousworlds)

Sometimes when looking at a painting, piece of medieval stained glass, or even the banner flying in the air at a large event, it can help to remember that in a relatively illiterate society messages were often conveyed by picture. Portraits were done not just to record a person’s appearance but to say something about them – how they wanted themselves to be remembered.  The paintings we have of Elizabeth I, for instance, are invariably conveying messages : the ermine on her sleeve, the map under her foot in the Ditchling painting, the book in her hand. Similarly, in the exquisitely illustrated illuminated books that have survived, the floral illustration frequently serves a purpose as well as being decorative. The following list is not exhaustive: animals ,too, [sic] had meanings, and their inclusion in a picture will add further layers, but the following at least gives a start and shows the wide range of plants with symbolic meanings that might have been grown in a Medieval or Tudor garden

(Source: mirousworlds)

theoddmentemporium:

Among the many medieval plague victims recently unearthed near Venice, Italy, one reportedly had never-before-seen evidence of an unusual affliction: being “undead. The partial body and skull of the woman showed her jaw forced open by a brick (above)—an exorcism technique used on suspected vampires.
Vampires were thought by some to be causes of plagues, so the superstition took root that shroud-chewing was the “magical way” that vampires spread pestilence. Inserting objects—such as bricks and stones—into the mouths of alleged vampires was thought to halt the disease. MORE.

theoddmentemporium:

Among the many medieval plague victims recently unearthed near Venice, Italy, one reportedly had never-before-seen evidence of an unusual affliction: being “undead. The partial body and skull of the woman showed her jaw forced open by a brick (above)—an exorcism technique used on suspected vampires.

Vampires were thought by some to be causes of plagues, so the superstition took root that shroud-chewing was the “magical way” that vampires spread pestilence. Inserting objects—such as bricks and stones—into the mouths of alleged vampires was thought to halt the disease. MORE.

(via mirousworlds)

mediumaevum:

Back to basics
A Norman lord, who lived in a castle, controlled a vast area of land, sometimes as much as two counties. He could not farm it himself. He divided it into smaller estates called manors. Each estate was given to a lesser lord. He was sometimes called the lord of the manor. The lord of the manor would give his loyalty and his service to the overlord in exchange for the estate.
The Manor House: The lord of the manor built the manor house. It usually had a tower and a look-out post. Farm buildings, such as stables, barns and cow byres, were built close by.

mediumaevum:

Back to basics

A Norman lord, who lived in a castle, controlled a vast area of land, sometimes as much as two counties. He could not farm it himself. He divided it into smaller estates called manors. Each estate was given to a lesser lord. He was sometimes called the lord of the manor. The lord of the manor would give his loyalty and his service to the overlord in exchange for the estate.

The Manor House: The lord of the manor built the manor house. It usually had a tower and a look-out post. Farm buildings, such as stables, barns and cow byres, were built close by.

(via mirousworlds)

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a seal! So… the deliberate mistake is that there is no actual manuscript attached to this. And actually, it’s not even medieval… it’s a modern reproduction of the Great Seal of Edward III (as would have been used in the 1340s). The National Archives made it for their public exhibition space. I thought it was interesting as surviving medieval seals tend to be pretty beaten up. It’s quite nice to admire one in mint condition. The size and detail of this seal helped indicate the power and importance of the King compared to the rest of the nobility (whose seals would have been much smaller).
Image source: The National Archives (UK) via the Flickr Commons. No known copyright restrictions.

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a seal! So… the deliberate mistake is that there is no actual manuscript attached to this. And actually, it’s not even medieval… it’s a modern reproduction of the Great Seal of Edward III (as would have been used in the 1340s). The National Archives made it for their public exhibition space. I thought it was interesting as surviving medieval seals tend to be pretty beaten up. It’s quite nice to admire one in mint condition. The size and detail of this seal helped indicate the power and importance of the King compared to the rest of the nobility (whose seals would have been much smaller).

Image source: The National Archives (UK) via the Flickr Commons. No known copyright restrictions.

(via mirousworlds)

deepredroom:

Lots of people are reblogging that armour gif again saying they’re happy to know the names of the various parts, so here’s a few more diagrams. Naturally, some styles of armour have extra or different parts and there are specially made suits for jousting and such.

A really important thing to note is that not every soldier/warrior of the time had plate armour. Chainmail was much more common. For as cheap and available as it was, it did a great job against most bladed weapons. It was only when swords made for stabbing and advancements in arrows came about that could break through the links that plate armour started to really get going. But it’s expensive and has to be custom made for each warrior, unlike the one-size-fits-all chainmail tunics.

The main thing to keep in mind when designing armour is what purpose you want it to serve. Does your character need maximum mobility? How do they fight? Do they come from a background where they could get their hands on a fitting suit? And if they are wearing a full suit of armour, make bloody well sure they can move in it! Fantasy armour is more often than not, impractical and does not “meld” together. Ever play a video game and your character’s armour will clip through their own body? Yeah, don’t do that. You’ll feel like a master if you come up with armour that fits well.

(via mirousworlds)

medievalthedas:

mediumaevum:

The Castle in Malbork is the largest castle in the world by surface area, and the largest brick building in Europe. It was built in Prussia by the Teutonic Knights, a German Roman Catholic religious order of crusaders, in a form of an Ordensburg fortress. The Order named it Marienburg (Mary’s Castle).

The castle seems to date from the 1300s. The castle’s website says:

On September 14th 1309, Grand Master Siegfried von Feuchtwangen moved his office to Malbork. The castle was promoted to the status of being the capital of one of the most powerful states on the southern coast of the Baltic. It soon became apparent that it could not fulfil its new functions in its current form.
The nearly forty-year-long expansion transformed a convent house into a strongly fortified High Castle. Surrounded by deep moats and several rings of defensive walls, it housed several representative rooms.
In the 14th and first half of the 15th century, a third part of the stronghold was established and expanded respectively – the Low Castle, known later as the Outer Castle.

It’s beautiful.

Part of me has formed a route to climb to the top. 

medievalthedas:

mediumaevum:

The Castle in Malbork is the largest castle in the world by surface area, and the largest brick building in Europe. It was built in Prussia by the Teutonic Knights, a German Roman Catholic religious order of crusaders, in a form of an Ordensburg fortress. The Order named it Marienburg (Mary’s Castle).

The castle seems to date from the 1300s. The castle’s website says:

On September 14th 1309, Grand Master Siegfried von Feuchtwangen moved his office to Malbork. The castle was promoted to the status of being the capital of one of the most powerful states on the southern coast of the Baltic. It soon became apparent that it could not fulfil its new functions in its current form.

The nearly forty-year-long expansion transformed a convent house into a strongly fortified High Castle. Surrounded by deep moats and several rings of defensive walls, it housed several representative rooms.

In the 14th and first half of the 15th century, a third part of the stronghold was established and expanded respectively – the Low Castle, known later as the Outer Castle.

It’s beautiful.

Part of me has formed a route to climb to the top. 

(via mirousworlds)

tinandcoppermakebronze:

this is p much my fav photoset on tumblr so ima just reblog it again

(via kissmyasuka)